Robotics and Intellectual Property

$295.00

Description

About the Course:

Robots have application in markets ranging from agriculture to defense; from automotive to health care; and, from manufacturing to consumer goods. It is estimated that the global industrial robotics market alone shall be worth $32.9 billion by 2017. Intellectual property — in the form of utility patents, copyrights, design patents, trade secrets, software patents, and trademarks — will be a major value driver for the robotics industry going forward.

This unique webinar provides insights into issues such as:

  • What are the differences in fully-autonomous, semi-autonomous and remote-controlled robots?
  • When should software code be protected by copyrights and when it should it be protected by software patents?
  • Why do robotics companies rely on trade secrets so heavily?
  • What are some of the limitations on protecting intellectual property with trade secrets?
  • How can small robotics companies protect their intellectual property when collaborating with large sponsors? How does First-to-File affect such collaboration?
  • How extensive is prior art in the robotics industry?
  • What are the risks for robotics companies that the government will exercise March-In Rights?
  • How should robotics companies avoid becoming entangled in the Economic Espionage Act?
  • How are robotics patent claims constructed?
  • What are the risks of joint ownership of robotics patents?
  • How valuable are provisional patent applications for robotics companies?
  • How can robotics licensors relieve themselves of indemnification liabilities?
  • How does the Digital Millennium Copyright Act lower the bar for deemed infringement of copyrights?

This session delves into great detail in connection with the most important robotics litigation and transactions, such as:

  • iRobot v. Koolatron & Urus Indus.
  • iRobot vs. Robotic FX
  • InTouch vs. VGo Communications
  • ISR Group v. Manhattan Partners
  • Kiva’s $770 Million Acquisition by Amazon

Course Leader: C. Andrew Keisner, Associate, Davis & Gilbert LLP

C. Andrew Keisner is an associate in the Intellectual Property and Litigation Practice Groups of Davis & Gilbert LLP. Mr. Keisner has extensive experience advising clients with contract and intellectual property matters in the advertising, marketing, public relations, interactive entertainment, and technology industries. He has represented clients in numerous federal and state courts, as well as in matters before arbitrators and administrative judges. Mr. Keisner has also represented clients in numerous federal and state appeals. He is typically involved with matters at an early stage and is often able to resolve disputes before a lawsuit is filed.

Mr. Keisner’s practice also includes handling intellectual property and indemnification provisions in agreements, as well as disputes concerning the enforceability of indemnification rights arising from a third party’s intellectual property claim. Within the technology industry, Mr. Keisner counsels digital advertising, software, and robotics companies, as well as investors on a wide array of issues. Having worked on cutting-edge robotics technology before becoming a lawyer, he has an in-depth understanding of the unique issues that technology companies face.

Prior to joining Davis & Gilbert, Mr. Keisner was a litigation attorney at Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton & Garrison LLP where he focused on intellectual property litigation, and in particular, patent litigation. During his third year at Cornell Law School, Andrew worked for the United States Attorney’s Office in the Northern District of New York on a variety of criminal and civil matters, including securities fraud actions, qui tam actions, drug trafficking matters, and Bivens claims. Mr. Keisner is a current member of the RoboBusiness Leadership Summit’s Advisory Council, a frequent speaker at robotics conferences, and a frequent lecturer at robotics companies on the subject of common and emerging legal issues that relate to robotics companies.

Course Length: Approx. 1.5 hours

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